In a Minor Key

Everyone’s life has a soundtrack, the music that plays in the background of the events of one’s life.  When I discovered that iTunes carried so many of the songs that comprise my soundtrack, I decided to write my story in sync with that music.  When I listen to these songs, they take me back to the places I inhabited and the person I was in those days, remind me of my friends and family, and mark out the rhythm of my life while I was listening to that music.

 I am sixty-eight, and I’ve often thought of writing down my story for my kids.  They’ve heard little snippets here and there, but I don’t want them to feel that they’ve missed out. I wish I had asked my own parents more about their lives, their motivations, their joys, their dreams, and their sorrows before they each passed on.

 

Prologue:      Human Warmth

The wooden sign over the glass window of the storefront said, “Human Warmth,” which seemed to be a good omen.  It was a few steps down from the sidewalk, across a small paved rectangular space. The front door opened into a room whose only furniture I remember was a padded wicker rocking chair, another good omen – a place to rock and nurse the baby who was coming soon.  A counter partition in the back on the right divided the front room from a much smaller one, and then a curtained doorway on the left led into the minimalist living quarters:  a bedroom with a low platform bed, divided from the small kitchen by a claw foot tub. and a bathroom whose toilet was flushed by pulling an overhead chain.  The back door from the kitchen led out into what passes for a yard in a city apartment, a tiny space of flagstones and weeds.

The place had been advertised as a sublet, and the man who was subletting – whose name I think was Allen – was kind and friendly; the price was affordable, and we could move in soon.  We did, several days later, and found that in the interim Allen’s kindness had extended to a bowery bum, whom he had taken in, bathed, and fed.  Although the man was gone, the unmistakable reek of urine, concentrated in the very pillows of the rocking chair I had already claimed for myself, apprised us of where the man had been sitting before his bath.  This should have given us pause, but we were in our twenties and full of idealism and energy.  My husband Carlos, know to most of his friends as “Charlie,” got a job in a macrobiotic restaurant around the corner.  At home, we baked bread.  Carlos had scrounged up an old Fred Braun sign and had made it into one of our own, simply stating:  BREAD.

We lived in New York City, in the East Village.  The people in our neighborhood, and those passing through who came in to buy our bread, didn’t mind the drying diapers strung on a clothesline behind the partition.  They didn’t know that we had to keep the oven pilot light on all the time to keep the roaches out of the oven. (Side benefit:  We could make perfect yogurt on the back of that stove.)  They didn’t know about the mouse our cat had chased around the tub while I was taking a bath, which she eventually deposited in one of the drawers of clothes kept under our bed.  They only knew that we baked bread, bread that was good, inexpensive, and often still warm from the oven.  The Hell’s Angels living down the street particularly liked the cinnamon raisin.  We enjoyed chatting with the people who stopped in for bread, and we appreciated the ease of having everything we needed within a few blocks’ walk; we had no car.  We did not intend, however, to live there for very long nor to bring up our precious baby boy in the noisy, dirty, crime-ridden city.  We dreamed of moving to the country and starting fresh in a clean and peaceful environment.  We searched ads for cheap homesteading properties in Alaska and worked on paring down our possessions to fit into one large trunk.

We had to move sooner than we’d expected, though, and not to the country.  Two authority figures confronted us within a short time of each other.  One was an inspector from the health department who told us we were selling bread illegally, with no license.  He definitely minded the diapers, the roaches, and the mice, so our home business came to an end.  The second visitor was the actual landlord, who’d known nothing about the sublet, which was in any case forbidden by the lease, because he’d not received any rent from Allen for several months – all the time we’d been living there.  Apparently Allen’s notion of “human warmth” did not preclude his breaking a rental contract, lying to us, and taking our $300 a month.

We moved on, and so will my story eventually, but before it does, I will go back, back to the beginning, where I was shaped into the person who walked into that storefront in the first place.

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One Comment on “In a Minor Key”

  1. Kathy says:

    Can’t wait for the next chapter! 💕


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